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dc.contributor.authorValdés-Pizzini, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Quijano, Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-21T21:31:50Z
dc.date.available2015-11-21T21:31:50Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn0008-6452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2677
dc.description.abstractFor generations, fishermen have constructed, shared, and refined knowledge (Traditional Ecological Knowledge) from their perceptions of habitats and species. Following our earlier work in La Parguera, Southwest Puerto Rico, we argue that fishers have a wealth of information on coastal ecosystem ecology, fish behavior, temporal patterns and spatial distribution. Recent work shows that fishers in other areas of Puerto Rico developed schemas that serve as cognitive models associating fishes, groups of fishes and habitats. This article explores the fishers’ mental schema of habitats and the habitat-species coupling using the specific example of mutton snapper or sama ( Lutjanus analis ). Traditional ecological knowledge can be an important component of information used in Ecosystem Based Management. Furthermore, TEK can provide unique knowledge and perspectives on local ecology and the health of fishery resources.
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of Arts and Sciences University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCaribbean Journal of Science, Vol. 45, No. 2-3, 363-371, 2009
dc.subjectCoral reefs and associated habitats
dc.subjectEcosystem Based Management
dc.subjectFisheries
dc.subjectLutjanus analis
dc.subjectTraditional Ecological Knowledge
dc.titleCoupling of humans, habitats and other species: a study of the fishers’ traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in La Parguera
dc.typeArticle


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